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The Secret Powers of Time
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Posted 6 years ago by wesley31NYC in category: interesting

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(guest) - 4 years ago [ Reply ]
@zorbear I'd say about 3/4th of the drop out reasons are totally wrong. The people that i see drop out of school are the kids who just want to get fucked up, and have a rave every night. Personally I'm a gamer, not a typical one, I'll say that, but i am a gamer. I'd like to say that. I'd also have to agree that the curriculum needs changing. Now, unfortunately, we are going to get slightly side tracked for a moment, because i have to explain what the different types of gaming there are. there's casual which is occasional gaming. There's social, which online play is highly preferred over single player. there's hardcore, which prefer to play in tournaments and are serious about their stats (call of duty is the worst and most common). There's creative gaming, which games like Halo reach(halo forge, map making), and minecraft, especially, greatly support creativeness, expression, and dedication(to updating, bug fixing, and just dedicating the time to building somethings that require a LOT of time to make). There are probably some other small categories i missed, and one big category i missed, but gamers come in all combinations of these types, unless, obviously, there are contradicting classifications in a definition. Now, back on track. Let's pull out the hardcore, gamers and throw them to the side, because hardcore gaming can't be implemented in any way to a school curriculum, unless you have them take stats, which blows. The casual gamer should have little to no problem with the way school is set up and will chug along with the crowd. Social gamers(keep in mind it's not JUST gamers, gamers it just what they used in the video) will usually have a hard time paying attention because they just want to interact with people constantly, so you'll usually catch them on their phone, texting in class, and listening to a teacher talk, and talk, and talk, jut sucks to them. Now, for the biggest controversial topic. The creative gamer. The creative gamer, sometimes, isn't even good at video games at all. They just want to make stuff for other people to enjoy. The problem is, most of these people are scientifically or mathematically oriented. Because of this, they find creative outlet in being creative in GAMES because a lot of times, it requires good mathematic or scientific (usually physics) based thinking and ability. Where schools fall short is that most schools, and society in general, only view creativeness as something like, say... a painting, or a poem. and NOT things like the redstone contraptions and whatnot in minecraft. You may be thinking, well how is redstone creative, what is it? look it up if you dont know what it is. and watch a few videos. Do you view some of the things you saw as creative? (i would recommend looking at cubehamster or AsdjkeAndBro on YouTube for a good perspective.) Well, they are. just because it doesn't have fancy designs or a deeper meaning, doesn't mean it's not creative. When creativity is confined to the arts, you only get classes such as sculptures or creative writing, and NONE to support the mathematically, and scientifically creative. If schools supported what kids are interested in, there would be no problem. And i dont mean video games, because usually video games (especially creative ones) are usually just the closest thing that can support their creative processing. Personally, i would be classified as a creative gamer, and i do make redstone contraptions. The reason i do it because i love making things like a 5 button button pad that where depending on the code you enter, a certain door will open, and it has over 625 different combinations, just from 4 digits. The biggest reason i love making those things though is because i want to see my work succeed, and impress people, and more importantly, bring fun, and smiles, and because my school doesn't offer any classes that have remotely to do with that kind of stuff. They offer classes on how to assemble computers, but not how to make them. God knows y we need computer assembly courses.

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